Trump’s victory: How change introduces endless possibilities for those embracing it

By Alec Hogg

You might recall New Agers causing a commotion after dredging out ancient Mayan calendars which ended in 2012. Some simplistically predicted this meant a physical end of the world on 31 December 2011. And when the earth kept on spinning, most of humanity made a joke of the whole thing.

But it seems those wily old Mayans were onto something after all. The world as we knew it may well have ended in 2012. The previous power equation certainly has. Consider this year alone: Brexit, Trump, Panama Papers, Wikileaks, Rousseff’s impeachment and in South Africa, ANC losing control of Joburg, Tshwane NMB and seemingly bulletproof Zuptas teetering.

All those events would have been as inconceivable in 2012 as Leicester City winning the English Premiership. Yet football’s Foxes beat the odds. And so have many other historically unlikely prospects. Like Donald Trump, who in July last year was a 50/1 shot to become US President.

Change introduces uncertainty. That rattles our stone age bodies and interconnected, space age markets. But change also brings opportunity and endless possibilities for those who embrace it. Life really is what you decide to make of it. More now than ever.

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during an election night party at the Hilton Midtown hotel in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States in a repudiation of the political establishment that jolted financial markets and likely will reorder the nation's priorities and fundamentally alter America's relationship with the world. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during an election night party at the Hilton Midtown hotel in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States in a repudiation of the political establishment that jolted financial markets and likely will reorder the nation’s priorities and fundamentally alter America’s relationship with the world. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg