Russia’s “Nelson Mandela” dead as Putin eyes Stalin’s record rule…

Supporters of Russia’s Nelson Mandela are crushed that he will never take that long walk to freedom now. Alexei’s Navalny’s death has sparked outrage across the world as it comes in the wake of a series of mysterious deaths of critics of President Vladimir Putin. It also comes on the eve of the second anniversary of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, a war in which the ruling African National Congress ((ANC) in South Africa has stuck to the side of its longtime ally, Russia. Deaths and denouncements have just bounced off Putin, who is looking strong enough to be re-elected for a fifth term, thereby possibly matching the long rule of Joseph Stalin. Listen to these issues being discussed by Max Seddon, the FT’s Moscow bureau chief. He was hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon on the FT’s News Briefing. Meanwhile, ANC support for Russia is not likely to waver – especially not after the party has allegedly been bailed out once again by a Russian oligarch.

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Relevant timestamps from the video

  • 00:00 – Introduction 
  • 01:02 – FT News briefing on Navalny’s death
  • 02:30 – Timing of Navalny’s death
  • 03:44 – How big of a hit is this for Russia’s opposition?
  • 04:42 – Direction Russia is heading
  • 05:31 – ANC and EFF support for Putin
  • 05:51 – EEF clip
  • 06:35 – Conclusion

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By Chris Steyn ___STEADY_PAYWALL___

Supporters of Russia’s Nelson Mandela are crushed that he will never take that long walk to freedom now.

Alexei’s Navalny’s death in a prison camp has sparked outrage across the world as it comes in the wake of a series of mysterious deaths of critics of President Vladimir Putin.

It also comes on the second anniversary of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, a war in which the ruling African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa has stuck to the side of its longtime ally, Russia. 

Deaths and announcements have just bounced off Putin, who is looking strong enough to be re-elected for a fifth term, thereby matching the long rule of Joseph Stalin. 

Read more: Death of Alexey Navalny reveals a grim signal of repression in Putin’s Russia

Listen to these issues being discussed by Max Seddon, the FT’s Moscow bureau chief. He was hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon on the FT’s News Briefing. 

Meanwhile, ANC support for Russia is not likely to waver – especially not after the party has allegedly been bailed out once again by a Russian oligarch. 

Russia is also guaranteed the support of the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF). Commander-in-Chief Julius Malema has repeatedly expressed solidarity with statements such as: “We are Putin. Putin is us”.

In its reaction to Navalny’s death, the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) has sent its heartfelt condolences to Julia Navalnaya and family.

“Navalny will be recorded in our history books for his unyielding bravery in the face of oppression and tyranny,” the DA said in its statement.

“The Kremlin bears sole responsibility for this shocking tragedy. Mr Navalny now joins the ranks of former opposition leader Mr Boris Nemtsov – both killed for their unwavering willingness to champion human rights, democracy and the rule of law.

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“As Russia spirals deeper into a dictatorship void of rights and freedoms, Mr Navalny will be remembered by many Russian citizens as an icon in the struggle against the fledgling Putin regime.

“That the ANC Secretary General was in Moscow fraternising with the enemies of freedom in the moment of Navalny’s death should send a resounding message to all South Africans as to where our government really stands.”

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