Faces of Covid-19: How the pandemic is hurting South Africans, in pictures

South Africa went into lockdown on March 26, with stringent measures put in place including staying at home, except for when obtaining essential services or products. From the onset, some of the regulations proved tough and were later labelled “contradictory and senseless”. While I understood why the lockdown had to be implemented and even extended, like many other South Africans, I worried about the economic aspect of it. Within the first few weeks, two of my friends lost their jobs. Another close friend had to “justify” why her current employer should keep her as opposed to another colleague doing the same job. Living in the heart of Johannesburg, it’s sad to see the many street beggars increasingly asking for help to feed themselves. A lot is being said about the need for government to find balance between saving lives, rescuing an ailing economy and ensuring that the livelihoods of its citizens are protected and I couldn’t agree more. In this new series, we look at the impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on South Africans, through pictures. Please feel free to send yours to my email address [email protected]. – Lindiwe Molekoa

Covid-19: South Africa (in pictures)

A man wearing a protective face mask holds a sign asking for money or food donations to automobiles waiting at a stop sign at an intersection in Pretoria, South Africa, on Thursday, June 11, 2020. The near-decade of mismanagement and corruption under former President Jacob Zuma combined with the coronavirus outbreak and loss of South Africa’s investment-grade rating have left the economy in its worst state in the democratic era. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg
South Africans
Local residents wearing protective face masks wait at a bus stop in the Imizamo Yethu township area of Hout Bay, in Cape Town, South Africa, on Friday, July 24, 2020. South Africa’s surging coronavirus infections and the resumption of rolling blackouts are clouding the outlook for the economy. Photographer: Dwayne Senior/Bloomberg

South Africans plead with government to rethink Covid-19 booze ban

“Our winery is the livelihood of 149 families. Don’t let this change by allowing government’s ban on wine sales to stay in place. We also stand in solidarity with the hospitality industry and ask that you continue to support your local eateries in any way you can.”

@SimonsigWines on Twitter

“The impact of the alcohol ban will have an immense effect on the SA Wine industry’s staff and families. Stellenbosch Hills stand united with the tourism, hospitality and wine industry.” #savesawine #jobssavelives #LiftTheBanSA

South Africans
@STBHills on Twitter

“Today, we stand shoulder to shoulder with restaurants, tourism, accommodation, and our wine industry” #ProudlyStellenbosch #JobsSaveLives

South Africans
@StellWineRoute on Twitter

“Warming up on Bree street with Family ⁦@GrubandVineCT making a noise” #jobssavelives

@manleysocial_ on Twitter

“Restaurants need to survive so we can continue to feed our families.” #JobsSaveLives

South Africans
@TheRealMaZwane
on Twitter

The Deputy Minister in the Presidency, Thembi Siweya engages Leeuwfontein corridor farms farm owners on compliance with COVID-19 regulations. The programme is a response to the President’s declaration that all Ministers and Deputy Ministers will be deployed to various districts in the country to monitor compliance with the COVID-19 regulations. [Photo:GCIS]

South Africans

The Deputy Minister in the Presidency, Thembi Siweya engages Leeuwfontein corridor farms farm owners on compliance with COVID-19 regulations.

The Deputy Minister in the Presidency, Thembi Siweya engages Leeuwfontein corridor farms farm owners on compliance with COVID-19 regulations.

Informal traders in Mamelodi preparing stock after the revision of the regulation [Photo: GCIS]

South Africans

Empty streets during the lockdown [Photo: GCIS]

Food for the poor. Personal protective equipment for health workers. Grants for the newly laid off. All have been looted as South Africa warns that corruptionputs our lives at risk.’ By @AP on Twitter 

@AP on Twitter
FILE — In this May 20, 2020 file photo, people affected by the coronavirus economic downturn line up to receive food parcels in Pretoria, South Africa. South Africa’s COVID-19 response has been marred by corruption allegations around its historic dollars 26 billion economic relief package, as the country with the world’s fifth highest number of COVID-19 cases braces for more. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe/File)
South Africans
People gather to buy fresh produce from a street vendor in the Central Business District (CBD) of Johannesburg, on Thursday, May 7, 2020. Almost one million people in Johannesburg, South Africa’s commercial hub, are in need of food aid due to movement restrictions imposed to curb the coronavirus pandemic, according to its mayor. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg

“South Africa has been severely affected by #COVID19. It is currently the most affected country in Africa. To support govt’s response efforts—2,150 @RedcrossSa volunteers have been trained and engaged in a range of COVID19 response activities across #SouthAfrica.” 

South Africans
@IFRCAfrica on Twitter

“This month @humanityfirstZA has started serving in #SouthAfrica

@HFI1995 on Twitter

“South Africa’s children are starving. Help @GiftoftheGivers cope with the demand during the lockdown by making a donation to help alleviate hunger.” Visit http://giftofthegivers.org/make-a-difference… or email [email protected]

South Africans
@life_podcasts on Twitter

Chinese embassy has donated supplies including 1,000 food parcels and 5,000 masks to less privileged families in Soweto township in Johannesburg, South Africa, amid #COVID-19 pandemic http://xhne.ws/Ar34Z

South Africans

@XHNews on Twitter

@XHNews on Twitter

South Africans

South Africans
A closing down sign is displayed outside an art shop at the Irene Village Mall in the Centurion area of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Thursday, June 11, 2020. The near-decade of mismanagement and corruption under former President Jacob Zuma combined with the coronavirus outbreak and loss of South Africa’s investment-grade rating have left the economy in its worst state in the democratic era. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg
South Africans
Trash pickers pull a cart past a mural in the Alexandra township of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Thursday, June 11, 2020. The near-decade of mismanagement and corruption under former President Jacob Zuma combined with the coronavirus outbreak and loss of South Africa’s investment-grade rating have left the economy in its worst state in the democratic era. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg
South Africans
A minibus taxi drives through the Randburg taxi rank in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Thursday, May 14, 2020. South Africa’s government announced plans to further ease a nationwide lockdown as the fallout from shuttering much of the economy threatens to outweigh the damage wrought by the coronavirus. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg.

Help us document how Covid-19 is affecting South Africans. Please send your pictures to: [email protected]

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