Following riots and unrest, demand for guns and ammo in SA has spiked

The rioting and civil unrest that gripped KwaZulu-Natal and parts of Gauteng saw the destruction of numerous businesses and plenty of infrastructure. Over 3,000 businesses were looted and destroyed, with over 300 banks and nearly as many post offices suffering a similar misfortune. What’s more, as MyBroadband reports below, an incredible R15bn in property damage was caused, with a further R1.5bn in stock losses. A silver lining in an otherwise very dark cloud was the way ordinary South Africans came together to protect what’s theirs. From taxi drivers’ guarding malls to communities banding together to protect their suburb, homes and local businesses, it showed the tenacity of the South African spirit – sadly, it also highlighted yet another problem. As looters helped themselves to stolen goods and wreaked havoc, the South African police stood idly by. Below, MyBroadband reports that a gun-buying craze has kicked off in SA. This is according to Paul Oxley, the chairperson of Gun Owners of South Africa. Speaking to ENCA, Oxley said that “people are doing what they need to do to defend themselves, their community, and their democracy.” The chairperson also commented on the current legislation around owning a firearm in SA, noting that ‘onerous’ licensing requirements fuels the illegal firearm trade. “There is a large black market for guns in South Africa, which Oxley said will grow unless the government makes legal gun ownership easy,” reports MyBroadband.  Read the original article, “Gun buying craze in South Africa.” Republished with permission. – Jarryd Neves

Gun buying craze in South Africa

By MyBroadband

Many South Africans are buying guns after communities were left to fend for themselves in the recent riots in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

The protests and looting caused tremendous harm, including R15bn in property damage and R1.5bn in stock losses.

Approximately 3,000 stores were looted, with extensive damage caused to 161 malls, 11 warehouses, 8 factories, and 161 liquor outlets.

What shocked many South Africans is that the police and military were nowhere to be found during the uprising, and communities and business owners were left to protect themselves.

Many people feared for their lives and their property during the riots. This, in turn, has resulted in a spike in demand for firearms.

Gun Owners of South Africa chairperson Paul Oxley said there is a gun-buying craze in the country following the looting and unrest.

Speaking to ENCA, Oxley said some gun shops sold a million rounds in ammunition in one day following the riots in KwaZulu-Natal.

While it takes a long time to get a firearm license and a gun, many South Africans seem to plan ahead by investing in a firearm.

“People have seen that they are the final defence of democracy, as recognised by the police, the president, and the ANC,” said Oxley.

“People are doing what they need to do to defend themselves, their community, and their democracy.”

He said community members were on the frontlines to protect themselves against criminals. These people are now looking to arm themselves by buying guns.

Commenting on the current legislation around gun ownership, Oxley said onerous licensing requirements fuel the illegal gun trade.

“When the legislation is too severe, it drives people to seek alternatives,” he said.

There is a large black market for guns in South Africa, which Oxley said will grow unless the government makes legal gun ownership easy.

He said legal gun ownership does not increase crime. Instead, it gives communities the ability to stand up and defend themselves against criminals.

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